How to check Windows UpTime / How long has Windows been Active

How to check Windows UpTime / How long has Windows been Active

Have you ever at any point of using your Windows operating system been curious, for whatever reason, about checking for how long your Windows machine has been active since you booted it / restarted it, technically known as the UpTime?

Here are multiple solutions to your query:

Method #1: Using Windows Powershell (Note: Command Prompt will not work!) 

How to check Windows UpTime - How long has Windows been Active

# WMI query (WMI – Windows Management Instrumentation)

C:\WINDOWS\system32> (get-date) – (gcim Win32_OperatingSystem).LastBootUpTime

 

Method #2: Using Windows Powershell (Note: Command Prompt will not work!) 

How to check Windows UpTime - How long has Windows been Active

# WMI query

C:\WINDOWS\system32> Get-CimInstance Win32_OperatingSystem | Select-Object LastBootUpTime

 

Method #3: Using Windows Powershell (Note: Command Prompt will not work!) 

How to check Windows UpTime - How long has Windows been Active

# Event Log Query

C:\WINDOWS\system32> Get-WinEvent -ProviderName EventLog | Where-Object {$_.Id -eq 6005 -or $_.Id -eq 6006} | Select-Object -First 1 TimeCreated

 

Method #4: Using Windows Powershell or Command Prompt (Note: Both will work)

How to check Windows UpTime - How long has Windows been Active

# System Information Query

C:\WINDOWS\system32> systeminfo | find “System Boot Time”

 

Method $5: Using Windows Powershell or Command Prompt (Note: Both will work)

# WMIC (WMIC – Windows Management Instrumentation Command-line)

C:\WINDOWS\system32> wmic path Win32_OperatingSystem get LastBootUpTime

 

Method #6: Using Windows Powershell or Command Prompt (Note: Both will work)

How to check Windows UpTime - How long has Windows been Active

# WMIC

C:\WINDOWS\system32> wmic os get lastbootuptime

 

Method #7: Using Windows Powershell or Command Prompt (Note: Both will work)

# Task Manager

C:\WINDOWS\system32> taskmgr

– Navigate to “Peformance/CPU/

– Check the “Up time” under CPU details

 

Method #8: Using Windows Powershell or Command Prompt (Note: Both will work)

C:\WINDOWS\system32> eventvwr

– Navigate to “Event Viewer (Local)/Windows Logs/System/

– Navigate to “Filter Current Log…” on the Actions panel on right of the Event Viewer Window

– Find the text area under the text ‘Includes/Excludes Event IDs…’

– Clear ‘<All Event IDs>‘ and enter ‘6005,6006‘ and Click OK

– Click on the first event that appears

– Alternatively, you can sort the filtered logs by ‘Date and Time‘ in descending order to get the most recent date first and then click on the first event

Method #9: Using Windows Powershell or Command Prompt (Note: Both will work)

# Net Statistics

C:\WINDOWS\system32> net stats Workstation

– Check the “Statistics since to know what the uptime of your Windows machine is.

 

Method #10: Using Windows Powershell or Command Prompt (Note: Both will work)

C:\WINDOWS\system32> control

– Open the Control Panel and navigate to “Network and Internet/Network and Sharing Center/“. Then navigate to “Change Adapter Settings” on a right-placed panel of the control panel

– Alternatively, open Settings and navigate to “Network & Internet” and in “Status” navigate to “Change Adapter Options

– Inside the Adapter Settings / Network Connections find an adapter that is started when your Windows machine is started, for example; VirtualBox Host-Only Ethernet Adapter. Double-click on the adapter to open properties and check the “Duration: ” to know what the uptime of your machine is.

(Note: Network Adapters could prove to be inefficient if none of your adapters starts when your Windows machine finishes booting)”

 

 

 

 

How to check Windows UpTime / How long has Windows been Active
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